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Tap Steps 

Check out some of Tim's choreography! 
           

Steps with one sound

  • toe: tap the ball (toe tap) of the foot against the floor, use your ankle not your whole leg.
  • ball heel: strike the ball of the foot on the floor and drop your heel.
  • heel tap: strike the heel of the foot on the floor and release it immediately.
  • step: place the ball of the foot (toe tap) on the floor with a change of weight.
  • touch: using leg, push the ball of the foot on the floor without change of weight.
  • stomp: push the flat foot (toe and heel tap) on the floor without a change of weight.
  • stamp: place the flat foot (toe and heel tap) on the floor with a change of weight.
  • (heel) dig: push the heel tap onto the floor, keeping the ball off the floor (with or without change of weight).
  • heel (drop): standing on the balls of one or both feet, "drop"/push the heel on the floor, with or without change of weight.
  • ball (drop):standing on the heels of one or both feet, "drop" the ball on the floor, with or without change of weight.
  • toe punch/tip: hit the floor with the tip of the foot, usually behind the other foot, without change of weight.
  • toe stand: stand on one or both tips of the feet. This requires fairly stiff tap shoes.
  • hop: standing on one foot, jump up and land on the same foot.
  • leap: standing on one foot, jump up and land on the other foot.
  • brush: standing on one leg (e.g. the left), the other foot is "brushed out" by striking the ball of the foot (i.e.toe tap of the right) on the floor in a sweeping motion forward or backward from the hip.
  • scuff: as a brush, but striking the floor with the heel instead of the ball of the foot,

Steps with two sounds

  • shuffle: combine two brushes, one forward and one backward. A faster shuffle can be achieved by making smaller movements that are closer to the body. There are actually many different ways to perform a shuffle. Broadway-style shuffles use knee movement to swing the foot into a shuffle. Hoofers generally execute a shuffle from movement in the upper leg and hip. While a faster shuffle may seem to come from the ankle, it is actually mush easier to get speed and clarity from the hip, which is why this method is preferred.
  • scuffle or paddle: combine a scuff with a backward brush.
  • flap: brush forward and a step (which is striking the ball of the foot on the floor with a change of weight; similar to a walking step, only done on the ball of the foot—the heel does not touch the floor). The flap is often counted as "& 1." It is similar to the shuffle, but instead of brushing the ball back after the brush forward, the dancer steps (i.e. brush step instead of brush brush, as in a shuffle).
  • slap: brush forward and a touch, similar to the flap but without change of weight.
  • pickup: standing on the ball of one foot, jump up, hitting the ground with the ball of the foot you stood on, and land on the other foot.
  • pullback: standing on the balls of one or both feet, jump up, striking the floor with the ball(s)toe tap(s) of the foot/feet, and land on the same foot (or again both feet)
  • riff: standing on one leg, swing the other leg to the front, first hitting the ground with the ball of the foot, then with the heel.
  • ball change: two steps on alternating feet. The first step does not get full weight.

Steps with three sounds

  • riffle/open third: a riff combined with a backward brush.
  • closed third/slurp: one foot is placed on the floor with or without weight, first hitting with the ball, then with the heel, then again with the ball. This step is usually very fast with precision.
  • shuffle-hop-step: a shuffle connected with a hop and a step on the foot that had brushed in the beginning.
  • three beat shuffle:the same movement as a two beat shuffle except with a heel

Steps with four sounds

  • cramp roll: Steps and heel drops can be combined to make a cramp roll which produces a rolling sound like a drum roll. It is performed by doing two steps (right then left or vice versa), followed by two heel drops (right then left or vice versa), releasing the first heel immediately upon completion. In other words, it is performed as "ball (R) ball (L) heel (R) heel (L)" and is often counted as "1 and a 2." It may be preceded by a brush (counted as "& 1 & a 2" and known as a flap cramp roll or 5-cramp roll) or done double time, known as a "bite cramproll" and counted as "a & a 1."
  • paradiddle: a scuffle, followed by step heel, all on the same foot.
  • riff walk: a riff, followed by a dig-ball on the same foot. Can be extended to a 5-sound riff walk by inserting a heel on the other foot between the riff and the dig-ball.
  • double shuffle: a shuffle with four beats, with relaxed movement of the foot.